Haiti Voter Beware

Fair and inclusive elections may prove impossible in Haiti this year. In the run-up to the Nov. 28 presidential vote, post-quake logistics are presenting huge challenges: some 230,000 dead have to be purged from voter rolls and 1.3 million displaced have to be reregistered—and the constitutional deadline for that has already passed.

But an even greater problem may be Haiti’s electoral commission itself. It has sidelined 15 candidates without explanation and has excluded the Lavalas Party, which stands in opposition to the current president, René Préval. International investors and donors are worried that a tainted election will further impede the country’s already hobbling reconstruction efforts. Experts say rebuilding Haiti will necessarily infringe on individuals’ property rights—and the less trust Haitians have in their government, the quicker they’re likely to fight back. In the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, lesser issues have stirred unrest

Click HERE to see the story as it appeared in Newsweek.

Nurse Cadue Guerier is photographed for her National ID card, which will enable her to vote in November 28 elections. -Jacob Kushner.

SPECIAL REPORT: Haiti, Women, and the Elections: Following Africa’s Lead

By Anne-christine d’Adesky with Jacob Kushner

On September 25, a series of urgent SMS text messages from Haiti sent many racing to their computers and radios again, fearing the worst. Like the historic 30-second earthquake that leveled much of Haiti on January 12, a freak storm had slipped over the mountains, creating fresh calamity. Amwe! Help! ran the tweets and texts. Nouvo krase! We’re crushed again.

Click HERE to read the full story as it appeared at World Pulse magazine. 

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Power in Numbers: Reporters unite in one city to cover health care access

In Madison, Wis., 20 news organizations came together to produce dozens of stories on local health care access. The content was presented on a website that was created for the project. Not all Wisconsin media participated, though the project was eventually deemed a success. The model that was developed allowed each media outlet to “play to its respective strengths rather than conform to a particular style.”

Read the article with your IRE Journal subscription.